The Nene Valley Nature Improvement Area (NIA) will deliver a step change in nature conservation, where local organisations and communities come together with a shared vision for the natural environment. We aim to create more and better-connected habitats over large areas in the Nene Valley, which provide the space for wildlife to thrive and adapt to climate change.

Canoeing along the River Nene by Ian Wilson

The Nene Valley NIA also helps people as well as wildlife – through enhancing a wide range of benefits that nature provide us, such as recreation opportunities, flood protection, cleaner water and carbon storage. By uniting local communities, landowners and businesses through a shared vision for a better future for people and wildlife, we hope the Nene Valley will become a place of inspiration that are loved by current and future generations.

The Nene Valley is one of 12 NIAs that were selected through a national competition announced in the Natural Environment White Paper in 2011. More information about the competition and the national NIA programme can be found on the Natural England website.

Connecting People and Nature

The Nene Valley Nature Improvement area is re-creating and re-connecting natural areas along the Nene and its tributaries from Daventry to Peterborough. Local organisations and individuals are working together to make a better place for nature.

Why not explore the Nene Valley with our Virtual Tour? Click the image below to launch:

Picture by John Abbott

Picture courtesy of John Abbott

Latest News

What does the Nene Valley mean to you?

Take part in a new on-line survey to find out what local people think of the Nene Valley!

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Free seed from Blakesley Show!

On the 3rd August 2013 the Wildlife Trust and The River Nene Regional Park attended Blakesley Show and were distributing packets of free seed!

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Birdwatchers, the NIA needs you!

We need skilled birdwatchers to step up for nature in the Nene Valley, and lend us a hand with a special survey of breeding wetland birds in spring 2013.

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